To The Minute

Dr. Madison sat in her lab, staring at the machine she had spent years developing. Despite concerns from colleagues and ethical debates, Dr. Madison was determined to see her invention through to completion. She believed the potential benefits outweigh the risks.

The device had predicted a person’s death with complete accuracy. She had run multiple tests on volunteers, and the results had been consistent, always accurate to the minute. Then some volunteers panicked at knowing their end date. Others accepted their end date and made the best of their time.

Her mother had died without any warning or explanation. If Dr. Madison had known, she would have said all the things stuck in her head now. 

“It’s time,” she whispered to no one in the lab. “I need to know.”

With a deep breath, Dr. Madison inputted her personal information. The machine hummed and beeped, analyzing data. Dr. Madison’s heart raced waiting for the results. When the machine printed out a slip of paper, she snatched it up and scanned the results.

The shock of what she read almost made her drop the paper. The machine had predicted that she would die in just one week. One week. She trembled, couldn’t catch her breath, and her knees went weak. She whispered, “Really?” 

Dr. Madison had no known medical conditions, ate a healthy diet, and exercised regularly. How could this be happening?

She rechecked her data, but there was no mistake.

Dr. Madison stayed calm and carried on with her work, but dread hung over her. She started experiencing strange symptoms, a tightness in her chest, and a nagging cough.

Her colleagues found her slumped over her desk. The machine was still running. It had predicted her death with 100% accuracy after all. The news of her death spread quickly, and her machine became a sensation.


Initial Prompt:

You are a writer. In the not-too-distant future, a scientist invents a machine that can predict a person’s death with 100% accuracy. But when she tests it on herself, the results are shocking. write the short story. use active voice. avoid repeated words.

p2: good. give Dr. Madison a backstory to why she invented the machine


Initial Response: 

Dr. Madison sat in her lab, staring at the machine she had spent years developing. The device had the ability to predict a person’s death with complete accuracy. She had run multiple tests on volunteers, and the results had been consistent, always accurate to the minute. However, she had never tested the machine on herself.

With a deep breath, Dr. Madison sat down in front of the machine and inputted her personal information. She hesitated before pressing the button to initiate the test, knowing that she was risking a grim outcome.

The machine hummed and beeped, analyzing the data. Dr. Madison’s heart raced as she waited for the results. Suddenly, the machine printed out a slip of paper. She snatched it up and scanned the numbers.

The shock of what she read almost made her drop the paper. The machine had predicted that she would die in just one week.

Dr. Madison could not believe what she was seeing. She had no known medical conditions, ate a healthy diet, and exercised regularly. How could this be happening to her?

She tried to shake off the fear and focus on the task at hand. She had to figure out how the machine could have been wrong. She rechecked her data, but there was no mistake.

As the week passed, Dr. Madison tried to stay calm and carry on with her work, but she could not shake the feeling of dread that hung over her. She started experiencing strange symptoms, a tightness in her chest, and a nagging cough that wouldn’t go away.

On the last day of her life, Dr. Madison’s colleagues found her slumped over her desk, the machine still running. It had predicted her death with 100% accuracy after all. The news of her death spread quickly, and her machine became a sensation.

But as people flocked to see the device that had correctly predicted a person’s death, they couldn’t help but feel uneasy. The machine had worked perfectly, but the implications of such a technology were terrifying. Would anyone want to know the exact date of their death? And what would they do with that information?

Dr. Madison’s invention had changed the world, but at what cost?